More Dutch Cannabis Heading to the German Medical System – Weed News

Dutch newspaper Telegraaf reported earlier this month that exportation of medical cannabis from the Netherlands is looking very likely to increase due primarily to increases in demand fueled by the burgeoning market for medical marijuana in Germany. The Netherlands currently exports medical cannabis to Canada, the Czech Republic, Italy, Finland and Germany for medical use, scientific research, and importation and exportation of cannabis resins. The English language news website Dutch News reports: The current export limit is 100 kilos but this will soon be increased 350 kilos and go up again to 700 kilos in 2019, the Telegraaf said. Until now, the production of medical marijuana has cost more than is reaped in sales but the increase in exports will generate cash for the treasury, the Telegraaf said. Medical marijuana is not an official medicine in the Netherlands and is not included in the basic health insurance policy. Obviously the Dutch have long been known as a major international destination of cannabis liberty, with their quasi-legal and highly tolerant policies regarding the plant. Indeed the Netherlands has been growing cannabis for medical purposes since 2001 through its Cannabis Bureau agency. In the United States there are five categories, or schedules, in which regulated drugs are placed. Those drugs which fall into the “Schedule I” category are considered to have absolutely no medical value and are absolutely forbidden. Cannabis, along with a few other substances such as heroin and LSD, fall into this group. Unsurprisingly the Dutch take a much easier approach, in which drugs fall into two basic categories “hard drugs” and “soft drugs”. Recognizing that scientific research always yields new information, their policy allows for exemptions to be granted to certain agencies to study substances in the “hard drugs” category. The country’s Cannabis Bureau has received such an

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