The Latest: US House Leader Won't Pay for Climate Deal – New York Times

PARIS — The latest news from the U.N. climate conference that began Monday in Paris. All times local:
9:15 p.m.
U.S. House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy says the House will not go along if President Barack Obama tries to commit taxpayer money to support a climate accord reached in Paris.
He says Congress has the authority to decide how to spend U.S. taxpayer dollars, “and I don’t think that’s the best use of our money.”
McCarthy suggested that a must-pass year-end spending bill currently in the works could become the vehicle for language blocking any such expenditure.
The California Republican on Monday also criticized Obama’s overall approach at the Paris talks, saying he should be focusing on America’s progress in switching to natural gas and thereby reducing greenhouse gas emissions.
The House votes this week on several pieces of legislation aimed at confronting Obama on his climate policies, including taking aim at the administration’s controls on power plant emissions.
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8:55 p.m.
President Barack Obama is capping a day of high-profile climate talks with a quiet dinner at a chic Paris eatery.
French President Francois Hollande is hosting Obama, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and other top advisers at L’Ambroisie — one of the finest gastronomic restaurants in the trendy Marais.
L’Ambroisie’s menu is fit for a king — or an occasional president.
According to its website, delicacies like corolla of scallop meet white Alba truffle, and the flavors of tasty lobster fricassee are set off with Saint-Germain mashed peas.
It’s not aimed at diners with shallow pockets — dinner can cost up to 360 euros ($380).
The White House dubbed the outing a “working dinner.” The group of 12 sat in a cozy, lavishly decorated private room.
Obama told reporters snapping photographs to be careful in the luxurious surroundings, “Don’t break the chandelier. You can’t afford it.”
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8:25 p.m.
The leaders of six countries and the World Bank have called on economies across the globe to put a price on carbon dioxide emissions to fight global warming.
The heads of France, Germany, Chile, Mexico, Ethiopia and Canada all called for some kind of mechanism that essentially charges a price for each ton of carbon dioxide spewed by industry. It could be a simple tax or a more complex carbon credit trading system, they said.
“We simply cannot afford to continue polluting the planet at the current pace,” World …Read More

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