Grateful Dead Drummer Mickey Hart Announces Launch of Cannabis Brand

Grateful Dead drummer Mickey Hart has officially joined the Green Rush by announcing his new line of 1/3 gram mini-joints stuffed with a strain whose history is inextricably intertwined with the famed traveling jam band. Such is the debut of Hart’s brand Mind Your Head, which will be available for purchase at various Northern California dispensaries.

To celebrate the release of his new single serving joints, the drummer did an interview with music magazine Relix in which he waxes poetic about his debut product. Dead aficionados will no doubt find exciting the tin boxes of 10 of the mini-joints, decorated with a percussion-minded skeleton created by the musician himself.

But surely the most exciting aspect of the release is that the strain packed in the joints holds special significance for the Grateful Dead’s legions of fans. Chemdog is an indica-dominant, high (21 percent) THC flower that clocks in at 1.5 percent CBD. Legend has it that the strain was discovered by a man named Chemdog in 1991 outside of a Dead show at the Deer Creek Amphitheater (now known as the slightly less-poetic Ruoff Home Mortgage Music Center) in Noblesville, Indiana. From then on, Chemdog the dealer could often be

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Clark County, Nevada Will Use Money from Weed Businesses to Fight Homelessness

Commissioners in Clark County, Nevada have passed a resolution allocating almost $1.8 million from the local commercial cannabis industry to help subsidize programs dedicated to providing assistance to the homeless.

A little more than $930,000 of the earmarked money will be provided to HELP of Southern Nevada’s rehousing services “for medically fragile, non-chronically homeless households after leaving local hospitals,” according to KTNV in Las Vegas. The station reported that a little more than $855,000 will be given to HELP “to assist the program costs” associated with a homeless youth center.

Nevada legalized recreational marijuana use in the 2016 election, one of four states to pass such measures during that cycle. Recreational dispensaries opened up for business in Nevada in the summer of 2017, enabling adults to buy as much as an ounce of marijuana flower, as well as an eighth of pot concentrates.

Earlier this year, commissioners in Clark County hit pause on efforts to open cannabis lounges in Las Vegas, opting at the time to defer to state lawmakers. But the Las Vegas City Council voted earlier this month to allow dispensaries to apply for permits to open such establishments, where customers are free to use marijuana products.

In

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New Study Finds CBD Significantly Reduces Opioid Cravings in Addicts

Coming off of a heroin addiction is notoriously difficult. But a new study suggests CBD can make it much easier. According to a study published Tuesday in the American Journal of Psychiatry, cannabidiol (CBD) can significantly reduce cravings in people addicted to opioids and manage withdrawal symptoms. Cravings and abstinence anxiety are two of the most critical features of addiction, and triggering them often contributes to relapses and continued drug use.

Exploratory Study Highlights How CBD Can Help Beat Addiction

The consequences of the United State’s ongoing opioid epidemic have been staggering. Yet there has so far been little effort to develop treatment options for opioid addiction that are themselves not opioid-based—e.g. buprenorphine and methadone. Some states have tried to address this problem by adding opioid replacement qualifications to their medical cannabis programs.

In New York, for example, patients are automatically eligible for medical cannabis if a doctor prescribes opioids as a treatment for their condition. And multiple studies attest to the anti-inflammatory and pain-reducing properties of THC and CBD.

But cannabis may not only be a safer alternative to opioid painkillers; it may also be the safer, more effective way to ween people off of their addiction to opioids.

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This Fashion House Is Spinning Off a Cannabis Brand, and Its First Collection Is Wild

Weed, but make it high fashion: These $450 lighters and $955 stash bags are part of handbag brand Edie Parker’s new cannabis-focused venture.

For years, cannabis was contraband. Supplies were kept hidden away in dark drawers, and bongs stored out of sight. But now that states are quickly legalizing the plant, more people can display their weed openly. This raises some important interior decorating questions. What’s the most aesthetically pleasing way to present your stash? Where can you get a pipe that matches your coffee table?

Brett Heyman, founder and creative director of luxury handbag brand Edie Parker, is here for you.

– Read the entire article at Fast Company.

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How Legalization Changed Humboldt County Marijuana

In an isolated Northern California community, the last remnants of the counterculture are confronting the future of cannabis.

For more than forty years, the epicenter of cannabis farming in the United States was a region of northwestern California called the Emerald Triangle, at the intersection of Humboldt, Mendocino, and Trinity Counties. Of these, Humboldt County is the most famous. It was here, in hills surrounding a small town called Garberville, that hippies landed in the nineteen-sixties, after fleeing the squalor of Berkeley and Haight-Ashbury. They arrived in the aftermath of a timber bust, and clear-cut land was selling for as little as a few hundred dollars an acre. In their pursuit of self-sufficiency, the young idealists homesteaded, gardened naked, and planted seeds from the Mexican cannabis they had grown to love. They learned the practice known as sinsemilla, in which female cannabis plants are isolated from the pollen of their male counterparts, which causes the females to produce high levels of THC. The cultivators smuggled in strains of Cannabis indica from South Asia and bred hybrids with sativas from Mexico. They learned to use light deprivation to encourage premature flowering, and they practiced selective breeding to isolate for the most

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Presidential Candidate Cory Booker Wants Marijuana Justice

Sen. Cory Booker (D-NJ) has the strongest cannabis credentials of all the contenders for the Democratic presidential nomination in 2020.

Senator Booker is the lead author of the Marijuana Justice Act (MJA), which he originally introduced in 2017 and reintroduced in February. Four other Democratic presidential candidates are co-sponsors – Senators Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY), Kamala Harris (D-CA), Bernie Sanders (I-VT) and Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) – as well as Senators Michael Bennett (D-CO), Jeff Merkley (D-OR) and Ron Wyden (D-OR).

“The War on Drugs has not been a war on drugs, it’s been a war on people, and disproportionately people of color and low-income individuals,” Booker stated. “The Marijuana Justice Act seeks to reverse decades of this unfair, unjust, and failed policy by removing marijuana from the list of controlled substances and making it legal at the federal level.

“But it’s not enough to simply decriminalize marijuana. We must also repair the damage caused by reinvesting in those communities that have been most harmed by the War on Drugs. And we must expunge the records of those who have served their time. The end we seek is not just legalization, it’s justice.”

According to his office’s press release, the MJA would

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Vermont and New Hampshire May Delay Votes on Marijuana Proposals

Marijuana legalization measures in both Vermont and New Hampshire have hit a roadblock, reports the Associated Press.

In Vermont, marijuana has been legal since July 1, 2018, when a lawmaker-approved measure took effect. However, the law established no legal means of actually purchasing marijuana (they are the only state to legalize marijuana without allowing marijuana retail outlets).

The Vermont Senate passed a tax and regulate proposal earlier this session, as noted by the AP, but it won’t be acted upon in the House before January. Meanwhile, a legalization bill in New Hampshire could end up similarly delayed.

“We need to get a tax and regulated system as soon as possible, not necessarily for the money, but to at least regulate what people are using for a drug,”  State Senator Dick Sears (D) said on Friday. House Speaker Mitzi Johnson (D) has said the chamber doesn’t have time to deal with the issue before adjournment, expected within the next few days.

Governor Phil Scott (R), who supported the legalization proposal last year, has said he’s concerned about highway safety, and he’d like to see some effective way to measure impairment of drivers who use marijuana. He hasn’t said

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New Jersey Lawmakers May Vote on Medical Marijuana Expansion This Week

New Jersey lawmakers could vote as early as Thursday on a major medical marijuana expansion bill. Senate Bill 10 advanced out of a pair of committees on Monday, but only after undergoing multiple amendments. The amended version is not yet publicly available, but details are forthcoming. Still, the bill’s core framework remains the same, aiming to expand patient access to caregivers and licensed medical cannabis products. So even though adult-use legalization is off the table in New Jersey for the time being, medical cannabis consumers, caregivers and the industry stand to benefit from the bill’s new regulations.

Medical Marijuana Expansion Bill Would Improve Patient Access

New Jersey has been trying to grow its medical cannabis program under Gov. Phil Murphy’s administration. When Murphy took office in January 2018, the state had registered 30,000 medical cannabis patients. That number has since increased to 46,000. But the problem is that the state’s caregiver and dispensary infrastructure has not grown to keep up.

Currently, there are only six medical cannabis providers operating in the state. As a result, many patients approved for marijuana cannot access any.

New Jersey regulators have tried to approve more providers and get more businesses operating. But the application

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Group of Irish Doctors Publish Letter Outlining Health Concerns About Cannabis

More than 20 doctors have sounded the alarm on Ireland’s march toward marijuana legalization, lamenting what they called a “one-sided discussion about cannabis.”

The group of doctors, calling themselves the “Cannabis Risk Alliance,” voiced their concerns in a letter published Monday in the Irish Times; the signatories include Dr. Ray Walley, the former president of the Irish Medical Organisation.

“We are extremely concerned about the increasing health-related problems caused by cannabis across Ireland,” they wrote, citing “growing scientific data that indicates that cannabis use in young people is related to impairments to memory and thinking, which can endure long after cannabis use has ceased.”

Moreover, they wrote that cannabis use, particularly among young people, “is associated with increased risk of development of severe mental disorders particularly psychosis.”

Such warnings represent an increasingly fringe sentiment these days, with public polling around the world showing growing acceptance of recreational pot use and rising opposition to laws criminalizing the drug. In both the United States and Europe, efforts to roll back marijuana prohibition have been gaining steam.

The members of the Cannabis Risk Alliance acknowledged that the discussion surrounding cannabis use was driven by two separate concerns — “the argument in favour of

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Colorado Governor Reviewing Bill to Let Doctors Suggest Cannabis Instead of Opioids

As one of the first states to legalize recreational marijuana, Colorado has been somewhat of a testing ground for cannabis policy. Recently, the state fine tuned its distribution of weed revenues, considered geographic location of dispensaries vis à vis school sites — and now lawmakers want to tweak the list of qualifying conditions for patients of medical marijuana, which has been regulated in the state since 2000. Governor Jared Polis is currently reading over Senate Bill 19-013, which would add any condition that would typically lead to a opioids prescription to the list of medical marijuana qualifiers.

“This is going to be a pretty big deal for acute pain for athletes, and also for kids who have surgeries.” said the bill’s co-sponsor Edie Hooton. Advocates for the legislation see it as a panacea for the opioid addiction epidemic, which resulted in 578 overdose deaths in the state in 2017, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse.

The bill would authorize medical cannabis for children that have been prescribed opiates. Kids would not be able to smoke their cannabis, but would be legally able to utilize extracts and nasal sprays with the authorization of two physicians.

Governor Polis has until

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