Study Finds Legal Cannabis Reduces Illicit Grows in National Forests

Conversations about the effects of legalizing cannabis frequently focus on a few key issues: economic opportunity, social justice, the potential for new medical treatments, and other health benefits. What’s less talked about, however, is how cannabis legalization impacts the environment. Researchers have long documented the ways unchecked outdoor cannabis cultivation can strain resources and negatively impact the environment. And data from the U.S. Department of Justice shows that a significant amount of illegally produced cannabis is grown on federal lands— especially, national forests.

But what if legalization was making a difference? That’s exactly the question a new, first-of-its-kind study set out to answer. Do cannabis-related policies have any effect on illicit grow operations in U.S. national forests? The answer appears to be that yes, legalization does impact illegal grows. In fact, it reduces them significantly.

Expanding Legalization Reduces Illicit Grows in National Forests by a Fifth or More, Study Concludes

As the legal cannabis industry in the United States expands, demand for cannabis products is growing with it. But in the U.S. market, supply and demand have yet to find their equilibrium. So despite the major changes in the production and consumption of legal cannabis over the past decade, the

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Someone Planted 34 Cannabis Plants in the Vermont Statehouse Flower Beds

At least 34 cannabis plants were removed from a flower bed at the Vermont State House last week after a visitor to the state capitol in Montpelier reported their presence to law enforcement. Capitol Police Chief Matt Romei said, after the plants were discovered, that he was unsure if the young plants were hemp or marijuana and that groundskeepers on the property may have found more plants after the initial discovery.

The chief added that he was not surprised that the cannabis plants found a suitable home in the well-tended garden that lines a walkway in front of the statehouse.

“You could plant a 2-by-4 piece of lumber in there, and it would grow into a palm tree,” Romei said. “So it is totally not surprising that if somebody would put some marijuana seeds in there, they would grow like weeds.”

Growing at Home OK. The State House, Not So Much

The Vermont legislature legalized the possession of up to one ounce of marijuana by adults last year, with provisions of the legalization bill also allowing for the home cultivation of cannabis. Adults in the state are permitted to grow up two mature and four immature cannabis per residence.

Vermont

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New Group Organizing Cannabis-Focused Outings for Edmonton Professionals

A new Edmonton group wants to smoke out cannabis stigma by organizing social outings for professionals who are stoned.

Brad Ward is preparing to launch a series of events under the banner of Meet and Green.

His ideas include movie showings, charitable events and getting 20 or 30 people to smoke a joint, put on name tags and go on a hike together.

“I’d like to do something where we go out and support new businesses, like mom-and-pop restaurants that open up,” Ward said. “I think that could be really interesting, having a lineup of people who just smoked a joint with the munchies supporting a new pizza place.”

– Read the entire article at The Star.

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New Bill Ensures Some Retroactive Drug War Justice for New Hampshire

Governor of New Hampshire Chris Sununu has played a key role in the crafting of the state’s medical cannabis legislation. On Friday, in the latest of a series of cannabis vetoes, he struck down a bill that would have eliminated a requirement that patients have at least a three month relationship with their marijuana provider. But on the same day, he did sign into effect HB 399, which will have positive repercussions for those with past cannabis convictions. 

The latter will make it possible for those with past offenses concerning quantities of up to three-quarters of an ounce to have their conviction annulled. The legislation will apply to those whose offenses happened before September 16, 2017, the date when the state enacted sweeping decriminalization measures (becoming the last New England state to do so) that did not enact retroactive measures for past victims of Drug War policing.

Such annulments, however, will not be automatic. Individuals will still need to petition the court to have the offense erased from their criminal record. Prosecutors will have 10 days after the petition to object to the crime’s annulment.

“[This legislation is] going to affect hundreds, if not thousands of people,” the bill’s sponsor,

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A Walk Through the Cannabis Stock Graveyard

As one who has followed the cannabis sector closely for over six years, I have seen lots of ups and downs for its publicly-traded stocks. Investors today have, in my view, the opportunity to own some companies that have bright futures, but that wasn’t so much the case even three years ago, when most retail traders were still focusing on companies that were just silly penny stocks. Because these greedy opportunists continue to try to exploit retail investors even now, despite the vast improvement in the sector, I want to share some history from the past few years with the hope that readers will learn that they should just ignore these fraudsters and wannabees.

When I transitioned my professional focus to the industry in the nascent days of the cannabis stock market, all of the stocks traded “over-the-counter”, meaning that they weren’t listed on a major exchange, like the NYSE or NASDAQ. Today, while these exchanges are off-limits to American companies that grow, process, sell or distribute the federally illegal substance, they have opened to similar Canadian companies as well as some ancillary companies that serve the industry. Most of the primary listings for U.S. and Canadian cannabis operators are

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Cannabis Oil Can Reduce Seizures in Kids, University of Sask. Study Suggests

Report co-author says results are preliminary but promising.

Researchers at the University of Saskatchewan say preliminary results suggest medicinal cannabis oil can reduce or completely stop seizures in children experiencing severe and drug-resistant epilepsy.

The study, funded by Jim Pattison’s Children’s Hospital Foundation, monitored seven children with severe pediatric epilepsy, a debilitating condition that can cause children to suffer as many as 1,200 seizures a month.

Dr. Richard Huntsman, a pediatric neurologist at the university’s college of medicine and one of the study’s authors, said the results are nascent but encouraging. The overall reduction in seizures was close to 75 per cent on average.

– Read the entire article at CBC News.

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A CBD Company Now Owns a Big Chunk of Jones Soda

It’s common these days to hear about a food or beverage company investing in cannabis. It’s more unusual for a cannabis company to, say, snap up a soda brand.

In recent months, an emerging cannabis firm has quickly acquired a significant position in Jones Soda (JSDA) with an eye on bringing the wild child of soft drinks into CBD beverages.

Late Thursday, Heavenly Rx, a hemp portfolio company of cannabis investment firm SOL Global Investments (SOLCF), invested $9 million to buy 15 million shares of Jones Soda, bringing its ownership stake in the Seattle soda company to 25%. The infusion is a welcome sum for Jones, which has been accumulating losses.

– Read the entire article at CNN News.

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If You’re Curious About CBD, Give This Comprehensive Guide a Read Before You Try It

Whether you’re a CBD newbie or you’ve been (literally) bathing in it for years, figuring out your ideal dose is incredibly confusing—until now.

CBD oil is unquestionably the most buzz-worthy ingredient right now. It’s so popular, in fact, that revenue from products made with CBD—the naturally-occurring compound present in the flowers and leaves of cannabis plants (there’s no THC, which means it can’t get you high)—are projected to grow to $20 billion by 2024.

Why? CBD is compelling to consumers largely because it comes with a laundry list of promising purported health benefits—from reduced anxiety to help with nausea, inflammation, and insomnia. We’re still waiting for clearance from the FDA (and more robust research on the the proven perks of the ingredient), but in the meantime, many consumers are eager to test out the positive potential of CBD.

– Read the entire article at Real Simple.

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‘It’s So Difficult’: Canadian Cannabis Research Mired in Red Tape

Hundreds of academics across the country are waiting on a complex approval process to begin studying the impacts of cannabis on an array of topics including impacts on drivers, CTV News has learned.

Health Canada says that as it transitions hundreds of authorized research licences from the Narcotics Control Regulations to the Cannabis Act, “there have been challenges in processing times for new research licence applications.”

More than 350 existing research licensees are in the process, while only 65 new licences have been approved since cannabis was legalized Oct. 17, with another 250 applications at various stages of the review process.

– Read the entire article at News.

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CannTrust, ‘Leading’ Medical Cannabis Provider, Halts Sales Amid Health Canada Probe

CannTrust, which describes itself as a “leading” provider of medical cannabis, has voluntarily halted all sales and shipments of its product after Health Canada found that it was growing cannabis in five unlicensed rooms and after the ministry received inaccurate information.

The company has also set up a special committee to investigate the matter.

CannTrust is doing this as a “precaution” as Health Canada investigates the company’s facility in Vaughan, Ont., a company release said Thursday.

– Read the entire article at Global News.

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